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How gun laws get looser after mass shootings #shorts

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03.02.2023

State gun laws change after mass shootings all the time. And in Republican-controlled state legislatures, laws that loosen gun restrictions multiply. To watch the full version of this video, click here: 🤍 Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

The disastrous redesign of Pakistan’s rivers

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30.01.2023

British colonizers created a massive canal system in Pakistan — and helped cause the country’s deadly water crisis. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 In late summer of 2022, Pakistan experienced a devastating flooding event. An unusually severe monsoon season induced by climate change resulted in a third of the country being covered with water. Over 1,600 lives were lost, and water took months to drain out of lower-lying regions of the country, causing disease and displacement. On the flip side, Pakistan is among the most water-scarce countries in the world — expected to reach absolute water scarcity by 2025 if nothing changes. You can’t remove climate change from this equation, but an overlooked factor is the role that British engineering played in building water infrastructure along the Indus River and its tributaries, Pakistan’s sole source of surface water. A series of perennial canals, dam-like structures called barrages, and embankments were built to extract as much water from the Indus as possible and convert much of Pakistan’s arid landscape into farmland. But this water infrastructure exacerbates the destruction of flooding events and creates a hierarchical system along the canals in terms of water access. In our video, we explain the design of this water infrastructure and how Pakistan’s colonial past has made the country’s relationship with water even more precarious. Daanish Mustafa, who we interviewed for this video, co-authored a report on Pakistan’s water crisis: 🤍 We recommend The Juggernaut’s reporting on the legacy of dams in Pakistan: 🤍 For more context on how Pakistan bears the brunt of the effects of climate change: 🤍 We interview David Gilmartin for this story, who authored a book on the history of water engineering in the Indus basin: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Who was the first Asian nominated for Best Actress #shorts

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26.01.2023

The first Asian to be nominated for Best Actress didn’t identify as Asian. Confused? Vox senior producer Ranjani Chakraborty explains. Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

2022, in 7 minutes

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27.12.2022

Running up that hill with 8 billion people. Subscribe to our channel! 🤍 In 2022, the world population crossed 8 billion people — and we felt the scale of this monumental milestone in hundreds of ways. After over two years of lockdowns and quarantines, people eagerly restarted their lives, but there were certainly growing pains. Weddings and travel skyrocketed, but so did lost luggage and global inflation rates. Taylor Swift broke Ticketmaster. Cryptocurrency was headed toward a great year until it really, really wasn’t. 2022 tested the world population as we tested out life in a new phase of the pandemic. Russia invaded Ukraine, and aid relief flooded into the war-torn country. Refugees were welcomed into surrounding countries, and those who stayed behind inspired people around the world. Global protests cried out for justice in Iran. Football teams stood up for migrant workers and the LGBTQ+ community at the World Cup. Cuba legalized same-sex marriage. The world froze for a moment when England’s longest-reigning monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, died. And we all watched a lot of TikTok. As we head into 2023, take a moment to look back at the events that defined this year. For more on 2022 from Vox.com: Alissa Wilkinson’s The 25 best movies of 2022: 🤍 Constance Grady’s Vox’s 16 best books of 2022: 🤍 Marin Cogan’s Antisemitism isn’t new. So why did 2022 feel different?: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind-the-scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

How wide dynamic range makes dialogue harder to hear #shorts

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31.01.2023

It’s not just you — dialogue is harder to hear these days. Vox producer Ed Vega explains just one of the reasons why. There's more to the story though. You can watch our full video on the topic here: 🤍 Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

How BTS & BLACKPINK Rose To Fame | Everything You Need To Know About K-Pop

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04.02.2023

K-Pop has dominated the music industry with the likes of BTS, BLACKPINK, SEVENTEEN and Gangnam Style's PSY creating multiple hit singles. But, just how much do you know about K-Pop? Test your knowledge and find out everything you need to know! #MTVUK #KPOP #BTS #BLACKPINK #PSY #SEVENTEEN _ Sources: KPOP HISTORY in 20mins | From SeoTaiji to BTS - DKDKTV: 🤍 A BRIEF HISTORY OF K-POP - Los Angeles Film School: 🤍 All About K-Pop: Inside K-Pop’s History and Signature Sound - Masterclass: 🤍 How K-pop became a global phenomenon By Aja Romano, Vox.com: 🤍 VICE K-Pop Machine: 🤍 K-wave: How fans are supporting their favourite idols By Sophie Williams, BBC News: 🤍 How K-Pop Fans Actually Work as a Force for Political Activism in 2020 By Raisa Brunder, Time: 🤍 BTS, the band that changed K-pop, explained By Aja Romano, Vox.com: 🤍 BTS says they are not going on hiatus and that the initial announcement was due to a translation error By Rebecca Cohen, Insider: 🤍 BTS is one of the biggest music sensations in history. Here's a look back on their meteoric rise to stardom. By Inyoung Choi, Insider: 🤍 BTS' Most Generous Moments: From Million-Dollar Donations to Sharing Acts of Kindness By Diane J. Cho, People: 🤍 BLACKPINK: What You Need to Know About K-pop's Biggest Girl Group By Erica Gerald Mason, People: 🤍 BLACKPINK’s History-Making Accomplishments: A Timeline By Anna Chan, Billboard: 🤍 If You're Not Familiar With K-Pop, the Story of Blackpink's Origin Might Sound Wild By Anna Chan, Popsugar: 🤍 Everything to Know About K-Pop Group BLACKPINK BY Kat Moon, Time: 🤍 Inside Blackpink’s U.S. Takeover: How the K-Pop Queens Are Changing the Game By Nolan Feeney, Billboard: 🤍 _ More from MTV: 📰 MTV News: 🤍 🎥 MTV Movies: 🤍 ⚡ MTV Push: 🤍 Subscribe to MTV UK for more great videos and exclusives! 🤍 _ Get social with MTV 🤍 🐦 Twitter: 🤍 📷 Instagram: 🤍 📱TikTok: 🤍 💋 Facebook: 🤍 🎵 Official: 🤍 _ MTV UK is your place to watch all your favourites! Live EMAs performances, music artist to follow on MTV Push, latest MTV Movies exclusives and the best from Geordie Shore, Just Tattoo of Us, Teen Mom UK, Ex on The Beach and many many more! Thumbnail Images Via Getty Images: Dimitrios Kambouris / Staff / Getty Images Entertainment

Let’s talk about the parachuting beavers #shorts

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So dropping beavers out of planes was a weird relocation method but it worked 75 out of 76 times and let’s just be glad we’ve found other ways to relocate our furry friends. The Idaho Fish and Game channel has the whole video on parachuting beavers, and you can watch it here: 🤍 Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

The world's biggest wave, explained

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13.05.2022

And how it's transformed a Portuguese town. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Nazaré, Portugal was for centuries just a small fishing village known for its fishermen and dangerous seas. Then one day in 2011, a pro-surfer named Garrett McNamara strapped on a surf board and rode a 78 foot wave right off its coast. It was a new world-record for big wave surfing and the moment that changed Nazaré forever. Now, Nazaré is the capital of Big Wave surfing. The secret to Nazaré’s giant waves lies under the surface, where a huge underwater canyon funnels swells right up to its cliffs, then launches that energy straight up, sometimes 60, 70, or 80 feet. Many surfers visit in the hopes of catching a 100-foot wave. Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Why we all need subtitles now

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20.01.2023

It's not you — the dialogue in TV and movies has gotten harder to hear. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Have you ever been watching a show or movie, and then a character delivers a line so unintelligible you have to scramble to find the remote and rewind? For me, this moment came during the climax of the Pete Davidson film “The King of Staten Island,” where his most important line was impossible to understand. I had to rewind three times — and eventually put subtitles on — to finally pick up what he was saying. This experience isn’t unique — gather enough people together and you can generally separate them into two categories: People who use subtitles, and people who don’t. And according to a not-so-scientific YouTube poll we ran on our Community tab, the latter category is an endangered species — 57% of you said you always use subtitles, while just 12% of you said you generally don’t. But why do so many of us feel that we need subtitles to understand the dialogue in the things we watch? The answer to that question is complex – and we get straight to the bottom of it in this explainer, with the help of dialogue editor Austin Olivia Kendrick. Make sure you never miss behind-the-scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Why blackface is still part of Dutch holidays

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24.12.2022

The debate over The Netherlands’ Zwarte Piet, explained #blackpete #zwartepiet #sinterklaas #holidays Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

Why 99% of ocean plastic pollution is "missing"

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27.04.2021

The plastic we dump into the ocean might be hiding in plain sight. Subscribe to our channel! 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍. For the past several years scientists have been trying to account for the 8 million metric tonnes of plastic that we dump into the ocean each year. The assumption was that a large portion of it was floating out in one of the large garbage patches, where swirling debris accumulates thanks to ocean gyres. But recent measurements of the amount of trash in the patches fell far short of what’s thought to be out there. Scientists are getting closer to an answer, which could help clean-up efforts and prevent further damage to marine life and ocean ecosystems. In a previous version of this video, we mistakenly compared the size of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch to the area of Australia. It is in fact roughly 1.6 million square kilometers, a little more than twice the size of the state of Texas. A huge area, but not nearly as big as Australia. Source: 🤍 For anyone interested in participating in the Ocean Conservancy's annual beach clean-up events, here is the link with information: 🤍 For more reading, check out this New Yorker article on the missing plastic problem, which inspired this video: 🤍 Laurent Lebreton’s research that estimates the amount of debris in the garbage patches is here: 🤍 For more about Ocean Conservancy’s work, and their annual international beach cleanup events: 🤍 For more reading about Erik Van Sebille’s work: 🤍 For more reading about Melanie Bergmann’s work: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Or Twitter: 🤍

Which way do you hear this audio illusion? #shorts

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27.01.2023

Which way do you hear it? Noam Hassenfeld explains the tritone auditory illusion. Let us know in the comments! Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

The Middle East's cold war, explained

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17.07.2017

How two feuding countries are tearing apart the Middle East. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab: 🤍 The Saudis and Iranians have never actually declared war on each other. Instead, they fight indirectly by supporting opposing sides in other countries and inciting conflicts. This is known as proxy warfare. And it’s had a devastating effect on the region. Countries, especially poor ones, can’t function if there are larger countries pulling strings within their borders. And that’s exactly what's happening in the Middle East. The Saudi-Iranian rivalry has become a fight over influence, and the whole region is a battlefield. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Or on Facebook: 🤍

Two laws that make gun violence worse #shorts

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20.01.2023

We’re starting to learn which gun regulations work, and which ones might be making things worse. Joss Fong explains. Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

Why trees matter in a warming world

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28.11.2022

Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

How humans disrupted a cycle essential to all life

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11.01.2019

How one animal dug up carbon and put it back into the atmosphere at an astounding pace. Become a member of the Vox Video Lab! 🤍 Subscribe to our channel! 🤍 Carbon cycles through earth at a steady pace. Plants and microorganisms absorb carbon, which helps them grow. Animals and bacteria eat the plants, breathe out carbon into the atmosphere, and take some carbon underground when they die. And a similar process happens in the ocean. It's nearly a closed loop, although some plants and animals don't decay fast enough so they turn into fossil fuel, which traps the carbon underground. But one animal started to dig up that carbon — and burn it. For more in-depth reading, check out these articles: 🤍 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍. Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Or Twitter: 🤍

How the Merchant of Death got his nickname

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26.12.2022

How did Viktor Bout become the Merchant of Death? By swooping in and taking advantage of the post-Soviet chaos of the early 1990s. #viktorbout #britneygriner Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

Behind the scenes with Vox #shorts

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What the camera sees versus what you see. Filmed by Cath Spangler. Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 This was a studio shoot for our World Cup coverage where we covered everything from FIFA's corruption to penalty kicks. Check out the playlist here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

Vox.com | Ezra Klein | Talks at Google

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27.01.2015

Ezra Klein, Editor in-Chief for Vox.com, comes to Google to discuss the intersection of technology and news. If news stories were re-invented today, what would they look like? How would technology help facilitate the creation and distribution of stories? Prior to Vox, Klein managed a branded blog called "Wonkblog" at The Washington Post, which was The Post's most read blog in 2011. In 2011, he was named one of the 50 most powerful people in Washington, D.C., by GQ.

How America became a superpower

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23.11.2016

America grew from a colony to a superpower in 200 years. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at 🤍 2:07 Correction: Cuba seceded from the US in 1902. With over 800 military bases around the globe, the US is easily the most powerful nation on earth. But it wasn't always this way. The US once played an insignificant role in global affairs. In this 8-minute video, you can see the transformation. Military budget data: 🤍 US foreign bases based on David Vine's book, "Base Nation" 🤍 Troop numbers: "Total Military Personnel and Dependent End Strength By Service, Regional Area, and Country". Defense Manpower Data Center. November 7, 2016. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Or on Facebook: 🤍

The US House Speaker drama, explained #shorts

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06.01.2023

Republicans can’t agree on a Speaker, and that has big implications for the next 2 years. Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

Why you can't compare Covid-19 vaccines

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20.03.2021

What a vaccine's "efficacy rate" actually means. Sign up for our newsletter: 🤍 In the US, the first two available Covid-19 vaccines were the ones from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. Both vaccines have very high "efficacy rates," of around 95%. But the third vaccine introduced in the US, from Johnson & Johnson, has a considerably lower efficacy rate: just 66%. Look at those numbers next to each other, and it's natural to conclude that one of them is considerably worse. Why settle for 66% when you can have 95%? But that isn't the right way to understand a vaccine's efficacy rate, or even to understand what a vaccine does. And public health experts say that if you really want to know which vaccine is the best one, efficacy isn't actually the most important number at all. Further reading from Vox: Why comparing Covid-19 vaccine efficacy numbers can be misleading: 🤍 The vaccine metric that matters more than efficacy: 🤍 The limits of what vaccine efficacy numbers can tell us: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍. Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Or Twitter: 🤍

The real reason Boeing's new plane crashed twice

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This isn’t just a computer bug. It’s a scandal. Join the Video Lab! 🤍 Two Boeing airplanes have fallen out of the air and crashed in the past six months. On the surface, this is a technical failure. But the real story is about a company's desire to beat their rival. Read about Boeing's efforts to get the 737 Max reinstated for flight here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍. Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Or Twitter: 🤍

The surprising reason we call each other "guys" #shorts

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Hey guys, senior producer Coleman Lowndes here to explain. Source: “The Life of Guy” by Allan Metcalf Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

Why all world maps are wrong

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02.12.2016

Making accurate world maps is mathematically impossible. Follow Johnny on Instagram 🤍instagram.com/johnny.harris/ Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab: 🤍 Maps are flat representations of our spherical planet. Johnny Harris cut open a plastic globe to understand just what it takes to turn a sphere into something flat. His struggle to make a flat map out of the plastic globe is indicative of a challenge mapmakers have faced for centuries: It is mathematically impossible to translate the surface of a sphere onto a plane without some form of distortion. To solve this problem, mathematicians and cartographers have developed a huge library of representations of the globe, each distorting a certain attribute and preserving others. For instance, the Mercator projection preserves the shape of countries while distorting the size, especially near the north and south pole. For a more accurate view of land area look at the Gall-Peters projection, which preserves area while distorting shape. In the end, there's not "right" map projection. Each comes with trade-offs, and cartographers make projection decisions based on the particular tasks at hand. But if you are interested in seeing an accurate depiction of the planet, it's best to stick with a globe. Interact with projections: 🤍 Mercator tool: 🤍 Mike Bostock Map Transitions: 🤍 Mercator Puzzle: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Or on Facebook: 🤍

3 ways the 2022 election could go #shorts

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Story editor Adam Freelander summarizes. Want to watch more? Check out our longer take: 🤍 Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍

Are "yams" really sweet potatoes?

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22.11.2022

Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

Disney's Bob CEO drama, in one chart #shorts

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23.11.2022

It's pretty easy to understand the big Bob switch. Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

The 2026 World Cup has a huge math problem #shorts

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21.12.2022

FIFA has decided the next World Cup finals will include 48 teams instead of 32. This expansion is being done for a variety of reasons, but it's created a big problem. It's unclear how to fairly divide up the teams in the group stage. Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

How wildlife trade is linked to coronavirus

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06.03.2020

And why the disease first appeared in China. NOTE: As our expert Peter Li points out in the video, “The majority of the people in China do not eat wildlife animals. Those people who consume these wildlife animals are the rich and the powerful –a small minority.” This video explains how the people of China are themselves victims of the conditions that led to coronavirus. The virus is affecting many different countries and cultures, and there is never justification for xenophobia or racism. You can find further reading on this on Vox: 🤍 🤍 🤍 As of early March 2020, a new coronavirus, called COVID-19, is in more than 70 countries and has killed more than 3,100 people, the vast majority in China. That's where the virus emerged back in December 2019. This isn't a new phenomenon for China; in 2003, the SARS virus also emerged there, and under similar circumstances, before spreading around the world and killing nearly 800. Both SARS and COVID-19 are in the "coronavirus" family, and both appear to have emerged from animals in China's notorious wildlife markets. Experts had long predicted that these markets, known to be potential sources of disease, would enable another outbreak. The markets, and the wildlife trade that supports them, are the underlying problem of these pandemics; until China solves that problem, more are likely to emerge. Follow our reporting on coronavirus on vox.com: Our updated guide to Covid-19: 🤍 11 questions about the coronavirus outbreak, answered: 🤍 Why washing your hands is so important: 🤍 Watch our Netflix episode "The next pandemic, explained" 🤍 Further reading: Peter Li: 🤍 Peter Daszak, EcoAlliance: 🤍 WildAid: 🤍 On the animal source: 🤍 Support Vox by joining the Video Lab at 🤍 or making a one-time contribution here: 🤍 Note: The headline has been updated. Previous headline: Why new diseases keep appearing in China Note: A previous version of this video incorrectly colored Crimea as part of Russia on the map. While it has been occupied by Russian forces since 2014, it is still legally a territory of Ukraine. We've corrected the error. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍. Subscribe to our channel and don't forget to turn on notifications: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Or Twitter: 🤍

Why are three kids less common? Is it the car seats?

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21.11.2022

By Phil Edwards Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

How Qatar built stadiums with forced labor

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01.12.2022

And hurt thousands of migrant workers Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Ever since Qatar won the rights to host the FIFA World Cup in 2010, its treatment of migrant workers has made international headlines. News stories and human rights organizations revealed migrant workers who built the stadiums, hotels, and all the new infrastructure required for the World Cup were being forced to work, not getting paid, unable to leave, and in some cases, dying. At the heart of the abuse faced by migrant workers is the kafala system. A system prevalent in Gulf states that ties workers to their sponsors, it often gives sponsors almost total control of migrant workers’ employment and immigration status. Due to all the scrutiny Qatar has been under, some reforms have been put in place, but the kafala system is more than a law — it’s a practice. And while these reforms exist on paper, human rights organizations say there’s still a long way to go. To understand how hundreds of thousands of migrant workers were stuck in an exploitative system while building the stadiums for the World Cup, watch our 10-minute video above. Further reading and sources: To dig deeper into the exploitation and discrimination migrant workers face, here’s Equidem’s detailed report: 🤍 And here’s another report by Amnesty International: 🤍 To understand the migrant experience, check out this infographic from Migrant Rights that walks you through the process that traps them: 🤍 Migrant Rights’ full report on Nepali migrant worker deaths can be found here: 🤍 To learn more about initiatives to compensate migrant workers, you can check out Amnesty International’s campaign here: 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

The fusion breakthrough, explained in 60 seconds

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22.12.2022

Breaking down fusion in 60 seconds Subscribe to our channel! 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍. Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Or Twitter: 🤍

The 116 images NASA wants aliens to see

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Here are all the photos flying through interstellar space on Voyager's Golden Record. 🤍 Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at 🤍 Sources: 🤍 🤍 🤍 When Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 launched into space in 1977, their mission was to explore the outer solar system, and over the following decade, they did so admirably. With an 8-track tape memory system and onboard computers that are thousands of times weaker than the phone in your pocket, the two spacecraft sent back an immense amount of imagery and information about the four gas giants, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. But NASA knew that after the planetary tour was complete, the Voyagers would remain on a trajectory toward interstellar space, having gained enough velocity from Jupiter's gravity to eventually escape the grasp of the sun. Since they will orbit the Milky Way for the foreseeable future, the Voyagers should carry a message from their maker, NASA scientists decided. The Voyager team tapped famous astronomer and science popularizer Carl Sagan to compose that message. Sagan's committee chose a copper phonograph LP as their medium, and over the course of six weeks they produced the "Golden Record": a collection of sounds and images that will probably outlast all human artifacts on Earth. /// Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

How did turkeys get so big #shorts

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24.11.2022

By Jayne Quan and Kristen Williamson Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

We tracked what happens after TikTok songs go viral

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A data investigation into how TikTok is shaping the music industry, in collaboration with The Pudding. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 It’s no secret that TikTok is a virality machine. Songs get turned into sounds that can be used in any video, and if they gain enough traction they can catapult a musician into the pop culture stratosphere. But we wanted to know exactly what happens between a song going viral and an artist becoming a bonafide success. So in the fall of 2021, we partnered with data analysis website The Pudding figure it out. Along the way, we discovered that using data to concretely answer this question is quite a challenge. Our process included creating dozens of custom data sets, careful fact-checking, and conversations with both hit songwriters and music industry executives to match data with real experiences. After seven months of spreadsheets, data deep-dives, and interviews, we were able to follow the numbers to track what happens to artists after they go viral — and how the music industry has shapeshifted around TikTok. It turns out the app is completely revolutionizing the way record labels work, and giving artists more leverage than ever. Check out the data on The Pudding's website here: 🤍 More from The Pudding: 🤍 | TikTok: 🤍the_pudding Additional credit: Researcher Halley Brown You can find all of our interviewees at the links below: JVKE | TikTok: 🤍JVKE | IG: 🤍itsjvke L.Dre | TikTok: 🤍ldrethegiant | IG: 🤍ldrethegiant | YouTube: 🤍youtube.com/ProdByLDre Tom Rosenthal | TikTok: 🤍tomrosenthalmusic Mary Rahmani | 🤍moonprojects.com Ari Herstand | aristake.com Elias Leight | Twitter: 🤍ehleight Matt Daniels | Twitter: 🤍matthew_daniels Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍 Shop the Vox merch store: 🤍 Watch our full video catalog: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 Follow Vox on Twitter: 🤍 Follow Vox on TikTok: 🤍

Who is this mysterious celebrity? #shorts

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13.01.2023

Do you recognize the celebrity on this fabric? A subreddit has been investigating the origins of “Celebrity 6” for two years now, but despite more than 200 guesses, no one can pinpoint the photo the image came from. We do research for stories all the time, but this one stumped us: maybe you have the answer. Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

"Bárbara escalada de Putin contra civiles en Ucrania", analiza 'Vox.com'

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19.10.2022

Abrimos Revista de prensa con un texto publicado en 'Vox.com', que plantea tres planos de análisis sobre la escalada de la ofensiva rusa contra objetivos civiles en Ucrania: el internacional, el interno ruso y el psicológico de Vladimir Putin. Continuamos con el periódico italiano 'La Presse', que filtró un audio en el que Berlusconi cuenta a miembros de su partido, Forza Italia, que ha vuelto a estrechar su relación con el presidente ruso, del que es "el primero de sus cinco amigos". 🤍 🔔 Suscriba a nuestra cadena en YouTube: 🤍 🔴 En VIVO - Siga FRANCE 24 aquí: 🤍 🌍 Nuestro sitio: 🤍 Únase a la comunidad Facebook: 🤍 Siganos en Twitter: 🤍 Descubre las noticias en imágenes en Instagram: 🤍

How New York City became "Gotham" #shorts

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05.01.2023

Vox producer Coleman Lowndes takes us through the etymology that made New York City Gotham before DC Comics ever did. Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: 🤍 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out 🤍 Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: 🤍 Check out our full video catalog: 🤍 Or our podcasts: 🤍 Follow Vox on Facebook: 🤍 If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: 🤍

LEGEND OF VOX MACHINA Season 2 Ep. 7-9 Breakdown & Easter Eggs

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04.02.2023

The campaign continues as Vox Machina pick up where they left off in last week’s explosive cliffhanger. While the group managed to escape certain doom, they now find their party split and must navigate their way back together before the final batch of episodes drop next week. Hector dives in to break down all the easter eggs, hidden details, and everything else you might have missed in this week’s episodes of The Legend of Vox Machina on today’s Nerdist News! More Vox Machina News: 🤍 Watch more Nerdist News: 🤍 Follow Us: Facebook 🤍 Twitter 🤍 Instagram 🤍 TikTok 🤍 Image: Prime Video #NerdistNow #DnD #VoxMachina #CriticalRole

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